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2 edition of Harvest estimates for selected marine sport fisheries in southeast Alaska during 1995 found in the catalog.

Harvest estimates for selected marine sport fisheries in southeast Alaska during 1995

Dennis J. Hubartt

Harvest estimates for selected marine sport fisheries in southeast Alaska during 1995

by Dennis J. Hubartt

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Published by Alaska Dept. of Fish and Game, Division of Sport Fish in Anchorage .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Fisheries -- Alaska, Southeastern -- Statistics.,
  • Fishing surveys -- Alaska, Southeastern -- Statistics.

  • About the Edition

    Creel surveys of the Juneau, Ketchikan, Sitka, and Petersburg marine sport fisheries for chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha were conducted during 1995. Estimates from these surveys were necessary to provide data for inseason management of the chinook salmon sport fishery in Southeast Alaska to meet an allocation determined by the Alaska Board of Fisheries. Dockside interviews of boat-parties completing trips were used to estimate angler effort for and total catch and harvest of chinook salmon. Harvest and total catches of other Pacific salmon and trout Oncorhynchus species, Pacific halibut Hippoglossus stenolepis, lingcod Ophiodon elongatus, rockfish Sebastes species, and Dolly Varden Salvelinus malma were also estimated. In addition, harvests of crab and shrimp were estimated in Ketchikan and Petersburg; while harvest of crab was estimated in Juneau. The contributions of hatchery chinook salmon and coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch to these sport fisheries were estimated from coded wire tag recovery information. Coded wire tag sampling programs conducted at Wrangell and Craig also provided hatchery contribution estimates. Scale samples and lengths were taken from chinook salmon for age composition and length-at-age estimates in all fisheries. Lengths of Pacific halibut were taken to estimate total round weight of the harvest from existing length-weight relationships. The estimated harvest of chinook salmon was 26,977 (SE = 524), and the estimated catch was 63,493 (SE = 5,227) in the boat sport fisheries monitored. Harvests of chinook salmon were lower than the long-term average in the Ketchikan fishery, but about average in the Juneau fishery. Hatcheries in Alaska, British Columbia, Washington, and Oregon produced about 50% of the monitored chinook salmon harvest, and 37% of the total harvest was of Alaska hatchery origin. In Juneau hatcheries produced about 46% of the chinook salmon harvest, and Southeast Alaska hatcheries contributed 45% of the total harvest. In Ketchikan 25% of the harvest was of hatchery origin, and the percentage of Alaska hatchery chinook salmon harvested was estimated to be 21% of the harvest. The estimated Alaska hatchery contribution of chinook salmon was 36% in Sitka and 63% in Petersburg, and coded wire tag sampling in Craig and Wrangell revealed that chinook salmon from Alaska hatcheries contributed about 4% and 15%, respectively, of the harvest in those locations. An estimated 46,352 (SE = 3,058) coho salmon, 34,638 (SE = 3,701) pink salmon Oncorhynchus gorbuscha, 43,788 (SE = 1,901) Pacific halibut, and 18,684 (SE = 1,358) rockfish were also harvested in the sampled marine boat fisheries. Hatcheries produced 7% and 38%, respectively, of the coho harvest in Juneau and Ketchikan. The Pacific halibut harvest of 9,252 (SE = 762) in Juneau was below the long-term average, and the Ketchikan harvest of 19,675 (SE = 1,669) was the highest recorded. Shellfish effort was above average in the Juneau and Ketchikan fisheries, and Dungeness crab harvest was above average in Juneau and the highest recorded in Ketchikan.

    Edition Notes

    Statementby Dennis J. Hubartt, Allen E. Bingham, and Paul M. Suchanek.
    SeriesFishery data series -- no. 96-28.
    ContributionsBingham, Allen E., Suchanek, Paul M., Alaska. Division of Sport Fish.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationiv, 86 p. :
    Number of Pages86
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15449963M

    NMFS implements regulations to limit the harvest of Pacific halibut by guided sport charter vessel anglers in International Pacific Halibut Commission Area 2C of Southeast Alaska to the guideline harvest level (GHL) of , lb ( mt). The intended effect of this action is to reduce the. We work with others to study, manage, and conserve seabirds, waterfowl, raptors, shorebirds, landbirds, and loons/grebes in Alaska. The work we do within our Division of Migratory Bird Management is guided by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and international treaties. .

    Moreover, in recent years the State of Alaska has tightened regulations governing the harvest of other species of fish targeted by sport anglers. These tighter restrictions can be assumed to Start Printed Page reduce the attractiveness of a Southeast Alaska fishing trip and to reduce the demand for guided charters. The adverse impact of.   Rotating the harvest of natural resources is a management strategy that humans have used on land for centuries, but it is less commonly applied to marine resources. Marine animals, such as sea cucumbers, scallops, and abalone, may be particularly suited for this form of management. Although highly important to many communities worldwide, they are often severely overexploited, underlining Cited by:

    Residents of Southeast Alaska and their family and friends are the primary unguided anglers, while non-resident tourists are the main clients for guided fishing on charter vessels. Sport harvest data collected by ADF&G show that the through average guided sport harvest of halibut has been million lb ( mt) per year and the.   Management strategy evaluation (MSE) is widely used in fisheries as a decision support tool for evaluating the consequences of a range of management strategies, while acknowledging system y, it involves developing a model to describe the fishery, with a focus on identification and modeling of uncertainties as well as portraying different representations of resource dynamics ().Cited by:


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Harvest estimates for selected marine sport fisheries in southeast Alaska during 1995 by Dennis J. Hubartt Download PDF EPUB FB2

Creel surveys of the Juneau, Ketchikan, Sitka, and Petersburg marine sport fisheries for chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha were conducted during Estimates from these surveys were necessary to provide data for inseason management of the chinook salmon sport fishery in Southeast Alaska to meet an allocation determined by the Alaska.

Fishery Data Series No. Estimates of Effort and Harvest for Selected Sport Fisheries for Chinook Salmon in Northern Cook Inlet, Alaska, bY Dana E. Sweet, Allen E. Bingham, and Keith A. Webster October Alaska Department of Fish and Game Division of Sport Fish. Harvest Estimates for Selected Marine Sport Fisheries in Southeast Alaska During Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Division of Sport Fish, Fishery Data Series #, 41 pp.

Hubartt, D. J., A. Bingham, and P. Suchanek. Harvest Estimates for Selected Marine Sport Fisheries in Southeast Alaska During Southeast Alaska, fewer salmon released from Prince William Sound hatcheries inbut a fairly good outlook for Kodiak. The catch projections can be found in Tables 1 and 2.

The current all-species catch estimate is million. The actual catch was greater than our harvest projection of million salmon. aggregate abundance of the stocks within the fishery. During the cycle of the Pacific Salmon Commission (PSC), preseason forecasts of abundance for the Robertson Creek hatchery (British Columbia, Canada) chinook stock indicated a brood year failure.

These fish have contributed significantly to Southeast Alaska (SEAK) fisheries. This report provides information on the marine mammal stocks of Alaska under the jurisdiction of the National Marine Fisheries Service. Each stock assessment includes a description of the stock’s geographic range, a minimum population estimate, current population trends, current and maximum net productivity rates, optimum sustainable population levels and allowable removal levels, and.

Harvest estimates of selected marine sport fisheries in southeast Alaska during Fishery Data Series No. 00– Alaska Dep. Fish and Game, Juneau. 96 by:   THE STATED PREFERENCE MODEL.

The SPCE model estimated by Lew and Seung is used to calculate the probability of non-resident recreational fishing participation in model was estimated using SPCE data from a survey of non-resident anglers who fished in Alaska during 7,8 In each of the four SPCE survey questions, respondents are asked to choose between two fishing Cited by: 5.

Across Southeast Alaska, fisheries biologists with the Alaska Department of Fish and Game annually snorkel a selection of index streams that are home to this world renowned sport fish. It may sound strange, but donning a dry suit and snorkeling down a river is a noninvasive and cost effective method to monitor steelhead populations.

National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS). Notice of policy: Policy on applying the definition of species under the Endangered Species Act to Pacific salmon.

Federal Register [Docket20 November ] 56() National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS). Among-year estimates of smolt populations at the time of tagging ranged fromtofish, and fractions of the juvenile populations tagged annually ranged from to %.

Recoveries indicated the 2 stocks rear primarily in the inside waters of southern Southeast Alaska and are available for harvest over their entire oceanic life. The Alaska troll fishery exploited the stock at a relatively level rate (averaging %) with the exception of very low estimates ranging from –% during – In Southeast Alaska, a rule shifted charter halibut regulations from a two-fish bag limit with one less than 32 in., to a one-fish bag limit with no size restrictions.A majority of Sitka participants (58%) reported that this regulation increased the distance they traveled on an average charter trip, while 42% indicated no effect; no participants reported a decrease in the distance Cited by: 3.

As seen in the subsistence harvest of beluga whales in Cook Inlet, Alaska, inaccuracies in reported harvest numbers may occur when hunters shoot an animal but are unable to recover the body, a phenomenon called “struck and loss” (Mahoney and Shelden ).

Estimates of struck and loss from subsistence harvest marine mammals can be : Wendel W. Raymond, M. Tim Tinker, Michelle L.

Kissling, Brad Benter, Verena A. Gill, Ginny L. Eckert. The Southeast Alaska inside area flatfish trawl fishery was restricted to three small areas during the season with a harvest objective set for each area. As has been the case for the past five years, there was almost no effort in the Southeast fishery, with less than 9 mt of harvest reported.

ELSEVIER Fisheries Research 24 () Decision analysis of alternative harvest policies for the Gulf of Alaska Pacific Ocean Perch Fishery James N. lanelli*^, Jonathan Heifetz13 ''National Marine Fisheries Service, Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Resource Ecology and Fisheries Management.

Sand Point Way NE, Bin C, Seattle, WA Cited by: The Division of Sport Fish collects harvest and fishery information on rockfish as part of an ongoing port sampling program in the North Gulf of Alaska.

The objectives of this program are 1) to estimate the species, age, sex, and size compositions of rockfish harvests at select North Gulf of Alaska ports and 2) to characterize the recreational.

GHL and actual harvest levels of P. platyceros in Southeast Alaska. Based on population size assessments from tototal GHL (Guideline Harvest Author: Tom Levy, Sherry L. Tamone, Rivka Manor, Esther D. Bower, Amir Sagi. Title Subsistence-personal use salmon harvest, southeast-Yakutat management region, Summary This report summarizes household subsistence-personal use salmon harvests in Southeast Alaska between and using data from a permit program administered by ADF&G Division of Commercial Fisheries and data from household surveys conducted by the ADF&G Division of.

The aim of this study was to estimate M during the life cycle of the sea cucumber Isostichopus badionotus, a species under heavy fishing exploitation in the Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico.

The average harvest during the time period was chosen as being representative of recent trends in guided fishery harvests with the additional 25 percent over this average added to accommodate limited future growth based on estimated guided fishery harvest trends.waters of the Gulf of Alaska and Southeast Alaska (Dahlheim et al.), typically fisheries; however, this estimate is considered a minimum because of the absence of observer placements in all of In Book of Abstracts, Alaska Marine Science Symposium, Anchorage, Alaska, JanuaryDahlheim, M., A.Chinook salmon are harvested throughout the year by commercial and sport fishers in the waters of Southeast Alaska, British Columbia, and the Pacific Northwest.

Fisheries typically harvest highly mixed stocks of Chinook salmon and are therefore under the jurisdiction of the Pacific Salmon Treaty. Quotas are specified by the PSC and are.